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Dentwork, metal work - hammers, burnishers and the like

Taking care of your instrument

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mirwa
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Re: Dentwork, metal work - hammers, burnishers and the like

Postby mirwa » Fri Jun 20, 2014 8:12 pm

To shrink a headjoint, I use a boehm shrinker, something similiar is available from most suppliers, but you need a shrinker

mirwa
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Re: Dentwork, metal work - hammers, burnishers and the like

Postby mirwa » Fri Jun 20, 2014 8:15 pm

To repair a bell lip is 90 percent skill and 10 percent tools, the 10 percent tools are expensive, you could use a ferees dent centre, costs about 2300 aud landed, you could use a votaw dent centre costs about 1400 aud landed, or you could use boehms shaped mandrels, an alto unit would cost about 600 aud landed

mirwa
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Re: Dentwork, metal work - hammers, burnishers and the like

Postby mirwa » Fri Jun 20, 2014 8:18 pm

Straightening a rod can be achieved with a battery drill and a hole in your hammer, most of my hammers have various sized holed drilled into the handle for this purpose

It is far easier but just to make another rod and cut a thread accordingly

Straightening a hinge tube is a knack, its understanding how the metal will react as you bent it, overbend it, sometimes, very rarely you may have to follow up with a reamer, depends on how crushed a hinge tubing is.

mirwa
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Re: Dentwork, metal work - hammers, burnishers and the like

Postby mirwa » Fri Jun 20, 2014 8:24 pm

You have to know when to stop,

We have a repairer here in perth who thinks he is the repairer to the gods, he charges 800 to repad a clarinet (I charge 150) and thousands to do a sax, many times instruments are brought to me in boxes that have been sitting with this repairer for yrs.

By the time they get to me, they are stuffed because of his shoddy workmanship

Example I have a baritone sax that he pulled apart for a customer 3 yrs ago, only now after legal action and threats has the customer finally gotten it back, every key needs to be rebuilt, every rod needs to be replaced, there is nothing good left on this sax, there are bags with posts in them

You need to know when to stop and say cant do this.

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flutego12
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Re: Dentwork, metal work - hammers, burnishers and the like

Postby flutego12 » Sat Jun 21, 2014 6:12 pm

You have to know when to stop,

We have a repairer here in perth who thinks he is the repairer to the gods, he charges 800 to repad a clarinet (I charge 150) and thousands to do a sax, many times instruments are brought to me in boxes that have been sitting with this repairer for yrs.

By the time they get to me, they are stuffed because of his shoddy workmanship

Example I have a baritone sax that he pulled apart for a customer 3 yrs ago, only now after legal action and threats has the customer finally gotten it back, every key needs to be rebuilt, every rod needs to be replaced, there is nothing good left on this sax, there are bags with posts in them

You need to know when to stop and say cant do this.
Fully agreed. Thankfully our repairer to the "gods" in Sydney do awesome work - just priced out of reach fr most apart from the professionals and a rare few.
flutist with a screwdriver

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flutego12
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Re: Dentwork, metal work - hammers, burnishers and the like

Postby flutego12 » Sat Jun 21, 2014 6:26 pm

To repair a bell lip is 90 percent skill and 10 percent tools, the 10 percent tools are expensive, you could use a ferees dent centre, costs about 2300 aud landed, you could use a votaw dent centre costs about 1400 aud landed, or you could use boehms shaped mandrels, an alto unit would cost about 600 aud landed
Therefore a job for the professionals. How do you charge for something like that?
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flutego12
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Re: Dentwork, metal work - hammers, burnishers and the like

Postby flutego12 » Sat Jun 21, 2014 6:52 pm

Straightening a rod can be achieved with a battery drill and a hole in your hammer, most of my hammers have various sized holed drilled into the handle for this purpose

It is far easier but just to make another rod and cut a thread accordingly

Straightening a hinge tube is a knack, its understanding how the metal will react as you bent it, overbend it, sometimes, very rarely you may have to follow up with a reamer, depends on how crushed a hinge tubing is.
Matt Stohrer made it look easy. I'm sure there is a good level of skill involved, as breathing for those who have metal work basics fr high school - akin cookery or sewing classes. The judgement involved will be how big a hole to use. The kink is barely noticeable to the eye however unmistakeably there when one runs one's finger along the hinge tube. ... and - enough to freeze shut the Vise/vice Bb and corresponding lever arm. A result of which Bb and A becomes the same note.
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mirwa
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Re: Dentwork, metal work - hammers, burnishers and the like

Postby mirwa » Sat Jun 21, 2014 7:31 pm

Nice fingernail, how does one repair with nails like that

The kink is very noticeable, but you are also working with a solid tube there, not a hinged tube. I know matt he does good work

To repair something like that bell you charge by the hour, I estimate it would take me about an hr hr and a half to have it all rolled and smooth again, so that would be $60-$90, you may also need to relaquer the bell afterwards, so there will be a colour distortion

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flutego12
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Re: Dentwork, metal work - hammers, burnishers and the like

Postby flutego12 » Sun Jun 22, 2014 1:50 am

Nice fingernail, how does one repair with nails like that. :mrgreen: That's why I haven't... yet.

The kink is very noticeable, but you are also working with a solid tube there, not a hinged tube. I know matt he does good work

To repair something like that bell you charge by the hour, I estimate it would take me about an hr hr and a half to have it all rolled and smooth again, so that would be $60-$90, you may also need to relaquer the bell afterwards, so there will be a colour distortion
Hiya Steve.
Re Bell: Will it affect the sax's performance if left unfixed? Whilst we are at it, will the flute station be able to tighten tenon just a tad. All it says is refit and expand.
Re Kink: If it's a solid tube, will Matt's bench drill/ hole in hammer handle routine work? If that's the case, (I had thought the rod is stuck in the housing resulting in the freeze) if it's solid then, the freeze is possibly due to something else...
flutist with a screwdriver

mirwa
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Re: Dentwork, metal work - hammers, burnishers and the like

Postby mirwa » Sun Jun 22, 2014 3:51 am

It will not affect how the sax plays.

I suspect that because it's mis-aligned its binding on the pivot screws, or zap post has moved as well

To straighten simply tap it flat against a flat surface with a rawhide hammer

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flutego12
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Re: Dentwork, metal work - hammers, burnishers and the like

Postby flutego12 » Mon Jun 23, 2014 11:59 pm

It will not affect how the sax plays.

I suspect that because it's mis-aligned its binding on the pivot screws, or zap post has moved as well

To straighten simply tap it flat against a flat surface with a rawhide hammer
A post is dented in and I totally missed that! Seems that the point of impact was at least a foot long.
flutist with a screwdriver

msackett1955
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Re: Dentwork, metal work - hammers, burnishers and the like

Postby msackett1955 » Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:26 pm

Im really not a fan of the flute station, its beautifully made, and yes I have one and last time I used it was about 5 yrs ago (im guessing here but it would be close), and that was more for show and tell, but in reality it does not provide anything more than the most basic tools needed for most jobs, by buying it you limit the money spent to just flute repairs only, for the same money the tools you buy will allow you to repair flutes/trumpets/saxes etc..
Hi- I'm looking to purchase a JLS Flute Station. While I'm aware of their shortcomings, I am hoping to retire soon and would like to set up a way to repair my own instruments. I own and play a number of flutes, but likely won't be able to afford my repair tech once I retire. I'm wondering if you would be interested in selling your flute station? Please let me know.
Kindly,
Mark


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